The Catholic University of America

Course Descriptions

Psychology (PSY)

To view the complete schedule of courses for
each semester, go to Cardinal Station.

PSY 201: General Psychology

3.00 Credits

A study of the field of psychology, its nature and scope. Topics include growth and development, motivation and emotion, cognition and learning, sensation and perception, abnormal psychology and psychotherapy, mental abilities, personality and social psychology.

PSY 207: Early Childhood Development

3.00 Credits

This course closely examines the development of children during the first five years of life --from in utero through the infant, toddler, and preschool years. Students will learn about typical and atypical functioning and growth across cognitive, socioemotional, behavioral, and physical abilities. A particular focus of the class will be on deepening students' understanding of contributing factors to young children's development, including genetics, families, preventions/interventions, and public policies.

PSY 216: Psychology of Religion

3.00 Credits

Religion is one of the most powerful forces driving individual experience and the larger society and world. This course will explore the psychology underpinning this force. Beginning with introductions to classic writings by William James, Sigmund Freud, Carl Jung and Abraham Maslow, the course will explore why people become committed to religious beliefs and the ways in which religious institutions interact with individuals and groups. The course will examine religious fanaticism and terrorism through empirical, phenomenological and sociological approaches.

PSY 224: Psychology of Women and Men

3.00 Credits

Have you ever wondered how being male or female may impact how people think and behave? This course focuses on what theories and research in psychology have to say about sex and gender. It explores such topics as gender-role development, the nature and effects of gender stereotypes, differences (and similarities) between men and women, and the impact of gender on relationships, careers, and physical and mental health. Students also gain increased awareness of gender issues in their own lives and the world around them.

PSY 226: Close Interpersonal Relationships

3.00 Credits

In this course, students will examine how we come together and get along in adult intimate relationships. Topics such as attraction, friendships and intimacy, love, relationship stresses and strains, communication, conflict, loneliness, divorce, and maintaining and repairing relationships will be explored.

PSY 228: Modern Look at Freudian Psychology

3.00 Credits

Examines the work of Sigmund Freud (founder of psychoanalysis) and those who have followed in this tradition. Thoroughly explores the historical development of psychoanalysis and examines the far-reaching impact of Freud and psychoanalysis on contemporary psychology (psychotherapy), philosophy, culture, art, and literature.

PSY 232: Psychology of Stress & Coping

3.00 Credits

Covers physiological, developmental, and social psychological causes of stress, as well as strategies for coping with stress. Topics include the interrelationship of physical and psychological causes of stress, learned helplessness, the role of lack of predictability and control, and the role of life crises and transitions. Taught as a seminar, combining in-class and online student-teacher interaction. Summer sessions only.

PSY 240: The Aging Mind

3.00 Credits

This is a survey of the many ways in which mental function changes in healthy aging. Topics include perspectives on lifespan development; the aging brain; changes in perception, learning, memory, language and problem solving; the role of lifestyle factors (exercise, diet), genetics, and the environment; dementia and age-related memory loss as well as compensation for loss. The primary focus is on reviewing our scientific understanding of these issues, but the practical implications of this knowledge for life in an increasingly aging world are also considered.

PSY 243: Sport Psychology

3.00 Credits

An introduction to the psychological principles that relate to sport involvement and performance. Foci include performance maximization, anxiety in performance, and motivation, all in a variety of competitive and recreational circumstances.

PSY 245: Vocational Psychology

3.00 Credits

A study of the evolution of career counseling and vocational psychology theories. Students will learn the major theories of why people work, and will understand how people form identities and find fulfillment in their work. There will be out-of-class, applied learning involving assessment of the student's own career goals.

PSY 251: Psychology of Terrorism

3.00 Credits

This course reviews the psychological (clinical, forensic, political, social) underpinnings of terrorism, and the practical implications for living in a post 9/11 world. Topics include psychological approaches as applied to terrorist motivations, characteristics of terrorist organizations, preparing for terrorist attacks, counter-terrorism strategies, and emerging threats such as weapons of mass destruction and cyberterrorism.

PSY 261: Psychology and the Media

3.00 Credits

Are Instagram and Snapchat ruining social relationships? Is multitasking changing brain functioning? Do violent video games make children into killers? How badly do TV and movies inaccurately portray mental illness? This course explores the ever-changing relationship between the field of psychology and mass media. The course will explore how media images, and technological advances in general, have impacted our culture, the field of psychology, and the development of mental illness. In addition, the course examines how the media portrays specific mental disorders, the roles of psychologists, and psychotherapy.

PSY 302: Forensic Psychology

3.00 Credits

An introduction to forensic psychology, the application of psychology to the legal system. The course describes evaluations of criminal defendants and others involved in the legal system, and expert testimony regarding issues such as competency to stand trial, criminal responsibility, and violence risk assessment. The course also discusses the psychology of criminal behavior, and the roles of psychologists in police departments, prisons, and as trial consultants. Prerequisite: PSY 201.

PSY 303: Industrial Organizational Psychology

3.00 Credits

Industrial/Organizational Psychology will explore the relationship between people and work. In particular, we will examine the balance between work and life, the roles individuals have in organizations over the course of a lifetime, and the ways in which performance can be managed, measured, and characterized. Additionally, the organization as an entity will be discussed in the context of responsibilities, ethics, and its role in the lives of individuals and within societies. Prerequisite: PSY 201.

PSY 304: Brain and Behavior

3.00 Credits

Introduction to major theoretical concepts and research techniques in physiological psychology and neuropsychology. Topics include sensory, perceptual, cognitive, motivational, and affective processes in human and animal behavior, complemented by readings in established and important emerging areas of research on the brain and behavior.

PSY 305: Social Psychology

3.00 Credits

An introduction to the study of the individual interacting in a social context. Theories of attitude development and change, social perception, and small group behavior. Analysis of current research and methodology. Applications of social psychology. During the summer only, course is taught as a seminar, combining in-class and online student-teacher interaction. Prerequisite: PSY 201.

PSY 307: Child Development

3.00 Credits

Provides an introduction to basic theories, research methods, and research findings in child development. Addresses development in areas such as perception, cognition, language, personality, and social relationships. Examines development from conception through adolescence. Prerequisite: PSY 201.

PSY 308: Social Development

3.00 Credits

In this course students explore the important theories, methods, and findings in the field of social psychological development, with emphasis on development from infancy through adolescence. Topics include development of aggression and prosocial behaviors, emotion, self, and temperament, and the influence of parenting/family, peers, television, and schools. Prerequisite: PSY 201.

PSY 309: Psychology of Adolescence

3.00 Credits

Reviews theories and research on the psychological and biological changes of adolescence; changing relationships with parents; developing friendships and intimacy; changes in cognitive development, etc. Review of clinical disorders common in adolescence (depression, eating disorders, delinquency, substance abuse). Stresses societal-cultural influences on pubertal and adolescent development.

PSY 310: Cognitive Development

3.00 Credits

This course examines theories, methods, research findings, and controversies in cognitive development from infancy through adolescence. Topics include perception, attention, learning, memory, information processing, theory of mind, language and problem solving. The roles of biology and environment as contributors to these developmental processes are considered. Prerequisite: PSY 201.

PSY 322: Introductory Statistics

4.00 Credits

An introductory course in descriptive and inferential statistics as applied to social and behavioral sciences. Logic of quantification. Concepts of variability, probability, significance. Understanding and application of commonly used statistical procedures. Lab to be arranged.

PSY 345: Clinical Neuroscience

3.00 Credits

This course integrates brain impairment and clinical implications of schizophrenia, depression, stress disorders, Parkinson's disease, and other disorders that impose a huge cost to society in terms of individual and family distress and clinical needs. Students will gain insight into recent advances in neuroscience that are relevant to neurological and psychiatric diseases. Key areas of study include behavior, cognition, development and motor functions of normal and abnormal brain function. Prerequisite: PSY 304.

PSY 350: General Research Methods in Psychology

4.00 Credits

Introduction to the design, methodology, presentation, and ethics of psychological research. Topics include the measurement of behavior, hypothesis development and testing, the logic of different types of experimental and nonexperimental research designs, and evaluation of psychological research. Lab to be arranged. Prerequisite: 201.

PSY 371: Sensation & Perception

3.00 Credits

Investigation of research and theory of how we experience the objects and events in our environment through our senses. Topics include psychophysics, vision, audition, speech perception, and the chemical senses. Prerequisite: PSY 201.

PSY 373: Cognitive & Behavior Therapy

3.00 Credits

Behavioral and cognitive therapies have a large evidence base treating a wide range of psychological disorders. This course provides an introduction to the theories, principles, and empirical support for three "generations" of behavior therapy: traditional approaches emphasizing contingency management and exposure therapy, cognitive behavioral therapies to modify dysfunctional beliefs and thoughts, and more recent mindfulness- and acceptance-based approaches. Clinical applications are emphasized, and participation exercises allow for hands-on experience.

PSY 374: Personality Psychology

3.00 Credits

Reviews historical and current theories in the study of personality, examining theoretical conceptualizations from an empirical, scientific approach. Students are encouraged to critically analyze issues related to personality theory, assessment, research, and real world applications. Not open to students who have taken PSY 301. Prerequisite: PSY 201.

PSY 375: Psychology of Memory

3.00 Credits

Experimental course addresses how we remember things and why we forget. Topics include amnesia, eyewitness memory, memory tricks, and aging, as well as some of the fundamental models of human memory. Approach is cognitive and neuropsychological.

PSY 376: Cognitive Psychology

3.00 Credits

Explores the psychological mechanisms underlying human memory, language and thought. Lectures and readings focus on theoretical and experimental issues in learning, memory, attentional processes, psycholinguistics, and problem solving.

PSY 379: Life Span Development

3.00 Credits

This course examines psychological development from conception to late adulthood. Multiple theoretical perspectives will be discussed, as well as various components of human development (cognitive, psychosocial, physical, etc.). In addition, to learning the key developmental sequences that occur across the lifespan, students will learn about the mechanisms by which these changes occur and how psychologists study them. Additional emphasis will be placed on examining human development within and across contexts and cultures in order for students to come to a better understanding about biological, psychological, social, and cultural contributors to development. Prerequisite: PSY 201.

PSY 380: Abnormal Psychology

3.00 Credits

A survey of different perspectives on behavior disorders; emphasis on (a) different models of abnormal behavior, (b) adult mental disorders, and (c) current research issues in psychopathology. Prerequisites: 201.

PSY 381: Clinical Psychology

3.00 Credits

Designed as an introduction to the field of clinical psychology. Examines the history and development of the field, theories of normal and abnormal human behavior, research methods of clinical psychology, and clinical assessment and treatments provided by clinical psychologists. Specific assessment and treatment techniques will be discussed in depth. Also explores various professional issues (e.g., training, credentials, and ethics), controversies, and future developments. Prerequisites: PSY 201.

PSY 382: Abnormal Child Psychology

3.00 Credits

This course reviews psychological disorders in children and adolescents (e.g. autism, schizophrenia, depression, anxiety, behavior problems, ADHD, eating disorders). Emphasis is on exploring the symptoms that best characterize these disorders, their causes, how one assesses and diagnoses these in youth, and effective treatments. Prerequisites: PSY 201

PSY 383: Health Psychology

3.00 Credits

An in-depth study of the role that biological, psychological, and sociocultural factors play in our physical and mental health. Includes analyses of the interaction between physical health and psychological well-being. Health issues are discussed within the context of multi-culturalism and demographics. Prerequisites: PSY 201.

PSY 384: Community and Cultural Psychology

3.00 Credits

This class will examine mental health development within the context of local communities and broader societies and cultures. Students will be introduced to clinical and research approaches in community psychology, as well as learn how community psychologists work in the areas of prevention, environmental change, and public policy. The class includes a focus on developing an understanding of various cultural populations and of the role cultural competence plays in the effectiveness of community interventions. Prerequisites: PSY 201.

PSY 385: Psychology of Brain Injury

3.00 Credits

How do disorders of the brain affect our thinking and behavior? Different brain disorders can affect our ability to sense and move, to learn and remember, to speak and understand language, and many other abilities central to who we are. This class will provide an introduction to neuropsychology, the study of the relationship between behavior and the brain, focusing particularly on damaged brain systems. Topics include the causes of neurological disorders, their effects on thinking and behavior, and methods for assessing cognitive difficulties. The course will also explore how well people recover from brain injuries and the degree to which cognitive rehabilitation can help.

PSY 386: Developmental Disabilities

3.00 Credits

Prerequisites: PSY 201.

PSY 387: Community Interventions in Mental Health

3.00 Credits

How do neighborhoods, cities, states, and nations influence psychological development? What is the role of organizations (such as mental health agencies, hospitals, community centers, schools, and places of worship) in promoting positive mental health? Conversely, what features in the community lead to mental health difficulties? Further, what are scientifically-validated or promising approaches among community interventions in mental health? These questions and more will be addressed in this course. An emphasis will be placed on the interplay between practice, policy, and research. Prerequisites: PSY 201.

PSY 407: Psychology of Parenting

3.00 Credits

In this active learning course, students will investigate the psychological dynamics involved in parent-child relationships across the lifespan. Contemporary family issues will be explored, such as daycare, fertility, domestic violence and child abuse, parenting in a world of social media, single parenting, divorce, gay parenting, working/stay home parenting, adoption and foster parenting, parenting children with special needs, helicopter parents and boomerang children, and caring for aging parents, among others.

PSY 411: Mindfulness and Meditation I

1.00 Credits

This course relates the psychological study of mindfulness to the religious traditions of meditation. It explores how the underlying concepts and activities may serve as a special context for inter-religious dialogue. The course will use a seminar format to provide ongoing exploration that extends and amplifies the initiatives of the Way of Peace Fellowship, although prior fellowship participation is not required. A 2-credit second semester companion course (Mindfulness and Meditation II) will be available for those wishing to continue in order to have a 3-credit course. Fall semester only; 1 credit; no prerequisites.

PSY 412: Mindfulness and Meditation II

2.00 Credits

This 2-credit course focuses on the psychological study of mindfulness, including current research and theory. It is a continuation of Mindfulness and Meditation I, in which students gained an understanding of mindfulness/meditation in its original religious context and alternate religious/spiritual contexts, as well as its evolution to more secular practices. In addition to class assignments and readings from the psychological literature, the course has a continued emphasis on students maintaining a mindfulness practice outside of class. Completion of this course and Mindfulness and Meditation I will together constitute a 3-credit course. Spring semester only; prerequisites - Mindfulness and Meditation I (PSY 411, 611).

PSY 421: Positive Psychology

3.00 Credits

What have psychologists learned about how to cultivate happiness, well-being, creativity, and connectedness? This course examines the growing scientific field of positive psychology, including topics such as happiness, contemplative sciences and meditation, optimism, positive emotions, "flow," resilience to stress, altruism, and compassion. An emphasis is placed on the scientific basis of positive psychology constructs, including emerging brain science research, and how the field can contribute to bettering people's lives. Students will have the opportunity to engage in experiential evidence-based skill-building exercises for enhancing physical and mental health and well-being. Prerequisite: PSY 201.

PSY 446: Cognitive Disabilities

3.00 Credits

This course will explore selected cognitive deficits from the point of view of behavior and brain function. Cognitive areas examined will include attention, space perception, social cognitive, learning and memory, executive function, and language. Related deficits include developmental disorders such as autism, ADHD, and dyslexia, changes due to typical and pathological aging, such as memory loss and dementia, and psychological disorders such as schizophrenia.

PSY 447: Applied Cognitive Psychology

3.00 Credits

no description available

PSY 451: Senior Seminar

4.00 Credits

PSY 451 Senior Seminar (3) Seminar An examination of the relationship between specific courses and broader issues in psychology, between academic psychology and concrete problems. The framework used is that of major themes in psychology, emphasizing how common issues recur in a variety of contexts, with focus on a set of specific controversies. Within the constraints of class size, discussion is encouraged. A required seminar to be taken in the student's final fall undergraduate semester. For Psychology Majors only.

PSY 471: Laboratory in Sensation and Perception

1.00 Credits

Optional laboratory in sensation and perception to accompany 371. For psychology majors only. Prerequisites: 322 and 350; concurrent registration in 371.

PSY 473: Laboratory in Cognitive and Behavior Therapy

1.00 Credits

Optional laboratory in cognitive and behavior therapy to accompany 373. For psychology majors only. Prerequisites: 322 and 350; concurrent registration in 373.

PSY 474: Laboratory in Personality

1.00 Credits

Optional laboratory in personality to accompany 374. For psychology majors only. Prerequisites: 322 and 350; concurrent registration in 374.

PSY 475: Lab in Psychology of Memory

1.00 Credits

Optional laboratory in psychology of memory to accompany PSY 375. For psychology majors only. Prerequisites: PSY 322 (or HSSS 203) and PSY 350; concurrent registration in PSY 375.

PSY 476: Laboratory in Cognitive Psychology

1.00 Credits

Optional laboratory in cognitive psychology to accompany 376. For psychology majors only. Prerequisites: 322 and 350; concurrent registration in 376.

PSY 479: Laboratory in Life Span Development

1.00 Credits

Optional laboratory in developmental studies to accompany 379. For psychology majors only. Prerequisites: 322 and 350; concurrent registration in 379.

PSY 493: Research Apprenticeship for UG

1.00 Credits

Work as a volunteer assistant under the supervision of a faculty member in psychology on his or her ongoing research. (Offered each semester - student can take up to four research apprenticeships.)

PSY 495: Psychology Internship

3.00 Credits

The Psychology Internship is a supervised career-related professional experience that allows students to integrate information from academic psychology coursework with practice in the workplace. Requirements will include writing assignments that demonstrate this integration of knowledge. Open to juniors and seniors only. Permission of Psychology Undergraduate Director and Departmental Authorization required.

PSY 496: Senior Thesis

3.00 Credits

Intensive year-long independent research project for seniors, carried out in close supervision and collaboration with a faculty mentor and resulting in a final written thesis. Prerequisites: Prior research experience with mentor. Department Consent required.

PSY 498: Undergraduate Comprehensive Examination

0 Credits

A testing fee will appear on your CUA bill to cover the cost of the comprehensive exam.

PSY 505: Social Psychology for Graduate Business Students

3.00 Credits

An introduction to the study of the individual interacting in a social context. Theories of attitude development and change, social perception, and small group behavior. Analysis of current research and methodology. Applications of social psychology, with assignments relevant to business. Prerequisite: General Psychology or equivalent. Not open to students who have previously taken Social Psychology.

PSY 592: Readings in Psychology

3.00 Credits

Individualized study with a Department of Psychology faculty member, with focus, readings, and written assignments decided in collaboration.

PSY 592A: Readings in Psychology

2.00 Credits

Individualized study with a Department of Psychology faculty member, with focus, readings, and written assignments decided in collaboration.

PSY 592B: Readings in Psychology

1.00 Credits

Individualized study with a Department of Psychology faculty member, with focus, readings, and written assignments decided in collaboration.

PSY 594: Independent Study

3.00 Credits

Independent research under the guidance of a faculty member. Student expected to complete a theory or research paper in an area of special interest.

PSY 595: Psychology Internship

3.00 Credits

The Psychology Internship is a supervised career-related professional experience that allows students to integrate information from academic psychology coursework with practice in the workplace. Requirements will include writing assignments that demonstrate this integration of knowledge. Open to juniors and seniors only. Permission of Psychology Undergraduate Director and Departmental Authorization required.

PSY 611: Mindfulness and Meditation I

1.00 Credits

no description available

PSY 612: Mindfulness and Meditation II

2.00 Credits

This 2-credit course focuses on the psychological study of mindfulness, including current research and theory. It is a continuation of Mindfulness and Meditation I, in which students gained an understanding of mindfulness/meditation in its original religious context and alternate religious/spiritual contexts, as well as its evolution to more secular practices. In addition to class assignments and readings from the psychological literature, the course has a continued emphasis on students maintaining a mindfulness practice outside of class. Completion of this course and Mindfulness and Meditation I will together constitute a 3-credit course. Spring semester only; prerequisites - Mindfulness and Meditation I (PSY 411, 611).

PSY 615: Forensic Psychology

3.00 Credits

An overview of the interaction of psychology and the law. General discussion of similarities and differences between the two fields, followed by an in-depth discussion of psychopathology focusing on particular diagnoses commonly seen in forensic settings. Many other issues discussed, including assessment techniques, assessment of competency, the insanity defense, psychological profiling, treatment issues, abuse and neglect evaluations, custody evaluation, and expert testimony. Taught in a lecture/discussion format. Prerequisite: Senior standing or Permission of Instructor.

PSY 617: Seminar on Suicide

3.00 Credits

This graduate seminar will examine the topic of suicide in depth. We will consider theoretical and empirical perspectives from sociology, psychology, and genetics/neuroscience as well as philosophical and ethical issues related to suicide. There will be particular emphasis on clinical practice with suicidal patients; cultural, political, public health, and policy issues related to suicide will also be explored.

PSY 619: Health Psychology

3.00 Credits

no description available

PSY 620: Psychology, Biology and Technology

3.00 Credits

The meaning of "psyche," as a defining concept of psychological study, has changed a number of times. In recent years, its meaning has come under particular scrutiny with advances in the biological and computational sciences. This course examines how ongoing research influences the way in which we think of ourselves, our abilities, and our limitations, thereby helping to define what it is that psychology studies and how it contributes to our understanding of the human situation. It examines how these issues in psychology relate to our concepts of the normal and the therapeutic, the natural and the mechanical, and puts them into a larger social context.

PSY 621: Cognitive Rehabilitation

3.00 Credits

The goal of cognitive rehabilitation is to improve and compensate for cognitive impairments that have arisen due to injury or illness. This course examines the basic theories, methods, and applications of cognitive rehabilitation. The course will also focus on the important issue of assessing whether or not cognitive rehabilitation methods are effective.

PSY 622: Cognitive Development

3.00 Credits

This course examines theories, methods, research findings, and controversies in cognitive development from infancy through adolescence. Topics include perception, attention, learning, memory, understanding of the physical and social world, theory of mind, language and problem solving. The role of emotion and affect will be considered.

PSY 623: Applied Experimental Seminar

1.00 Credits

no description available

PSY 624: Seminar: Cognitive Science

3.00 Credits

A survey of research in cognitive science with an in-depth treatment of selected topics in cognitive psychology, cognitive neuroscience and computational modeling.

PSY 625: Psychological Perspectives on Aging

3.00 Credits

Examines the patterns of decline, stability, and growth which accompany normal aging from both empirical and theoretical perspectives. Review of the nature and causes of cognitive change in normal aging; consideration of the ways in which individuals compensate for losses which occur with aging. Biological, social, cultural, and demographic factors of aging are also considered.

PSY 627: Couples and Family Interaction

3.00 Credits

This seminar covers theory and research of normal couple and family processes, and families with psychopathology. Representative topics include normative and non-normative family transitions, parenting and parent-child communication, couples satisfaction and distress, and effects of parental psychopathology. Family research methods, and multicultural perspectives on families, are discussed.

PSY 628: Psychology of Memory

3.00 Credits

This course explores a broad range of topics relating to cognitive and neuropsychological aspects of human memory. For example, what do we know about people who are experts at remembering things? Why do elderly people seem better at remembering things that happened 40 years ago than things that happened 5 years ago? Why do you never forget how to ride a bike? Are there tricks for improving memory? Another major topic in the class is amnesia: what types of memory are affected by amnesia, what types are spared, and is there any effective treatment? The course includes models of memory and relates those models to the questions above. In-depth attention is given to the research of several contemporary memory researchers.

PSY 631: Sensation and Perception

3.00 Credits

An advanced survey of research and theory in sensation and perception. Special focus on integration of current findings at several levels of analysis. Work in neuroscience, psychophysics, and computational theory, with emphasis on visual and auditory systems.

PSY 633: Techniques in Electroencephalography/Event-Related Potentials

3.00 Credits

no description available

PSY 636: Human Computer Interaction

3.00 Credits

A survey of psychological research aimed at making computers easier to use. Topics include interface design, training systems, applications of artificial intelligence, etc. Focuses on general cognitive principles underlying design.

PSY 640: Human Development

3.00 Credits

A survey of the principles, theories, methods of inquiry, and research relevant to human psychological change across the lifespan in biological, neurological, cognitive, social, and emotional domains.

PSY 645: Social Development

3.00 Credits

Current research and theory in social development will be reviewed. Some of the topics covered include: attachment, temperament, sex-typing, and development of aggression and friendships across the life span.

PSY 652: Cultural Psychology

3.00 Credits

Examines the ways an individual's psychological and social development takes place in a cultural context. Readings include qualitative and quantitative studies of different parts of the lifespan in diverse cultures. Readings are drawn from both psychology and anthropology.

PSY 663: Social Psychology and Clinical Practice

3.00 Credits

A review of how social theory is applied to clinical practice: including diagnosis, psychological dysfunction, individual and group psychotherapy, and therapy outcome. Emphasizes both person-based processes (theories on self-esteem, self-efficacy, coping with threats to self, depression, and hope) and environmental-based processes (theories on relationships, interpersonal factors in depression, social comparison, and clinical decision-making).

PSY 670: Visualization and Virtual Reality

3.00 Credits

Research in human cognition provides a framework for computer design responsive to user needs. Discussion of theory and research supporting that framework, together with assessment of how theory supports development of design guidelines. Special attention to design issues of emerging technologies, including visualization techniques, the World Wide Web, and virtual reality.

PSY 671: Human Factors

3.00 Credits

An overview of the ways in which design and use of technology, broadly conceived, are assessed from a human perspective. Basic human capacities and limitations - physical, perceptual, and cognitive - are addressed. Theories of human performance are linked to real-world experience.

PSY 693: Research Apprenticeship MA

3.00 Credits

no description available

PSY 693A: Research Apprenticeship MA

2.00 Credits

The student may enroll for one, two, or three credits per semester. Register in Department of Psychology office.

PSY 693B: Research Apprenticeship MA

1.00 Credits

The student may enroll for one, two, or three credits per semester. Register in Department of Psychology office.

PSY 696: Master's Thesis Research

0 Credits

This course involves graduate student research conducted under the supervision of faculty. This may include a variety of research activities including proposing a study, developing background literature review, developing research design and methodology, collecting data, analyzing data, writing up research results for publication. Specific research expectations and goals are determined together by student and faculty research advisor. This course bills at the equivalent of three credit hours.

PSY 697: Master's Topic Paper Guidance

0 Credits

Only for MA topic paper guidance. Involves writing an informative, in-depth analysis of a particular content area, either theoretical or empirical, and/or conducting research under supervision of faculty. General requirements are in the Department MA Handbook. Specific expectations and goals for individual students are determined together with the faculty advisor. Requires concurrent registration in the Department. This course bills at the equivalent of one credit hour.

PSY 698A: Master's Comprehensive Examination (w/Classes)

0 Credits

no description available

PSY 698B: Master's Comprehensive Examination (w/o Classes)

0 Credits

Enrollment in this course bills at the equivalent of one credit hour.

PSY 705: Statistical Methods I

4.00 Credits

A graduate-level introduction to the theory and application of statistics in the analysis of psychological data. Descriptive statistics, t-tests, ANOVA, factorial ANOVA, regression, multiple regression. Computer laboratory (using SPSS) included. Prerequisite: One semester of undergraduate statistics.

PSY 706: Statistical Methods II

4.00 Credits

Repeated measures and mixed design ANOVA, ANCOVA, multiple regression with interactions, path models and structural equation models. Computer laboratory included. Prerequisite: One semester of statistics at graduate level.

PSY 707: Heirarchical Linear Modeling

3.00 Credits

This course examines the use of multilevel modeling (i.e., hierarchical linear modeling, or HLM) to study individual growth and individual differences in change, and nested data structures. Students learn to use multilevel modeling software, with emphasis placed on developing an understanding of the various types of questions that can be addressed using this methodology.

PSY 709: Biological and Cognitive Foundations

3.00 Credits

This course provides an introduction to major concepts of cognitive and biological psychology. The objective of the course is to provide a general orientation and appreciation of the issues, research methods, and approaches adopted in these areas. Topics will include sensory, motor, cognitive, and emotional processes as studied from both psychological and neuroscience perspectives.

PSY 710: Historical and Social Foundations

3.00 Credits

A broad survey of topics in cognitive, social and affective psychology including neuroscience topics. The objective of this course is to provide a general orientation and appreciation of the issues, approach, methods, and theoretical perspective adopted in these areas. Cognitive and social development will also be covered.

PSY 712: Seminar in Cognitive Disabilities

3.00 Credits

This course examines deficits in cognition across the lifespan from both a behavioral and neurological perspective. Readings and discussion focus on understanding the nature and underlying brain basis of illness-related cognitive change. Topics include healthy and pathological aging, developmental disorders such as autism, ADHD, and dyslexia, and psychological disorders such as schizophrenia. The course is conducted in a seminar format. Readings and discussion will cover historical views as well as the recent cognitive and cognitive neuroscience literatures on each topic.

PSY 714: Introduction to Neuropsychology

3.00 Credits

An introduction to the major theoretical concepts and clinical methods that concern the understanding of brain-behavior relationships. Included: an overview of brain functioning with a focus on brain structures and mechanisms of neurotransmission. Reviews major assessment instruments in specifying brain dysfunction, including clinical applications of the Halstead-Reitan and Luria-Nebraska Neuropsychological Test Batteries in the evaluation of children, adolescents, and adults. Formerly 616.

PSY 715: Neuropsychological Assessment

3.00 Credits

This course will review specialized neuropsychological tests and procedures that are commonly used to assess cognition and emotional behavior in individuals with brain disorders. The three most common approaches to neuropsychological evaluation [Halstead-Reitan-Russell, Luria-Nebraska, and Boston Process approach] will be reviewed with an emphasis on the latter. The neuropsychological tests will focus on speech and language functions, memory and learning processes, attention, executive abilities, concept formation, perception and visuomotor skills; issues related to malingering will be discussed. The course will also address interviewing techniques, how to read and extract information from medical charts, understand basic neurological procedures, including neuroimaging [PET, MRI, fMRI], EEG and brain stimulation.

PSY 726: Personality

3.00 Credits

Broadly examines personality, from both theoretical and empirical perspectives. Emphasizes the application of theory and research to professional activity (e.g., psychotherapy, nursing, and education).

PSY 728: Cognitive and Neuropsychological Approaches to Human Memory

3.00 Credits

This course explores a broad range of topics relating to cognitive and neuropsychological aspects of human memory. For example, what do we know about people who are experts at remembering things? Why do elderly people seem better at remembering things that happened 40 years ago than things that happened 5 years ago? Why do you never forget how to ride a bike? Are there tricks for improving memory? (Students will complete a project to improve their own memory as part of the course.) Another major topic in the class is amnesia, both in terms of types of memory that are affected by amnesia and types that are spared. The course covers models of memory including the distinctions between episodic/semantic, implicit/explicit, and procedural/ declarative aspects of memory and relates those models to the questions above.

PSY 733: Contemporary Psychodynamic Therapy and Practice

3.00 Credits

A broad examination of theoretical and clinical aspects of contemporary theories which have evolved from the original psychoanalytic theory of Freud. Considers - and makes clinically relevant - various concepts related to attachment theory, object-relations theory, and self-psychology. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

PSY 735: Developmental Psychopathology

3.00 Credits

Psychopathology in childhood and adolescence from a developmental perspective, including normal and abnormal processes, risk and protective factors, and developmental trajectories of psychopathology. Considers biological, psychological, and contextual (family,community, cultural) factors. Prerequisite: Psychology graduate students; others by Permission of Instructor.

PSY 745: Cognitive and Behavior Therapy

3.00 Credits

The practice of evidence-based psychotherapy is essential for clinical psychologists. This course provides a thorough exploration of the history, theory, empirical support, and applications of interventions from three "generations" of behavior therapy to a wide range of psychological disorders. Traditional behavioral approaches emphasizing contingency management and exposure therapy, cognitive behavioral therapies to change dysfunctional beliefs and thoughts, and more recent mindfulness- and acceptance-based approaches are addressed. Critical issues in research and clinical practice are emphasized.

PSY 755: Affective & Cognitive Neuroscience

3.00 Credits

This seminar will examine the neural systems mediating emotional and cognitive processes, and how these processes interact with and affect each other. Students will consider how emotion influences perception, memory, attention, and judgment, and how cognitive processes can have emotional consequences. The course will consist of reading primary articles that employ neuroscience techniques such as lesion and neuroimaging studies. The relationship between emotion and cognition will also be discussed in the context of psychological disorders such as anxiety, depression, and bipolar disorder.

PSY 759: Cognitive Neuroscience

3.00 Credits

A survey of current research on the neural systems mediating cognitive processes of attention, memory, language, and imagery. Emphasizes interrelationships between computational, psychological, and neural models of cognition.

PSY 777: Psychology of Emotions

3.00 Credits

Discussion of major psychological approaches to emotion, with emphasis on experimental and social theories. Students are expected to outline and defend their own definitions and theories of emotion. Readings and discussion of current research in the psychology of emotion including the relationship of physiological activity and emotion, recognition of verbal and nonverbal expressions of emotion, memory and emotion, and neuropsychological approaches to emotion.

PSY 780: Applied Memory Research

3.00 Credits

Examines the applications of memory research in a variety of areas, such as the law (e.g., eyewitness memory), survey research (e.g., memory factors in answering interview questions), and medicine (e.g., remembering to take prescriptions). Students expected to write a comprehensive research paper on applications of memory research in a particular area.

PSY 792: Readings in Psychology

3.00 Credits

Individualized study with a Department of Psychology faculty member, with focus, readings, and written assignments decided in collaboration.

PSY 792A: Readings in Psychology

2.00 Credits

Individualized study with a Department of Psychology faculty member, with focus, readings, and written assignments decided in collaboration.

PSY 792B: Readings in Psychology

1.00 Credits

no description available

PSY 793: Research Apprenticeship for PhD

3.00 Credits

Supervised study of selected topics. Individual research. Participation in ongoing research programs of the department. Formerly 715.

PSY 795: Psychology Internship

3.00 Credits

The Psychology Internship is a supervised career-related professional experience that allows students to integrate information from academic psychology coursework with practice in the workplace. Requirements will include writing assignments that demonstrate this integration of knowledge. Open to juniors and seniors only. Permission of Psychology Undergraduate Director and Departmental Authorization required.

PSY 805: Assessment in Clinical Practice

3.00 Credits

no description available

PSY 807: Clinical Assessment of Children and Adolescents

3.00 Credits

This course provides an introduction to the theories and techniques of assessing emotional, cognitive, behavioral, personality, and social functioning in youth. Through readings, lectures, class discussions, and demonstrations, the course will focus on hypothesis development and testing, selection of assessment tools, and techniques used by psychologists to evaluate the functioning of a child and adolescent in multiple domains. The course will review the application of data for aiding case conceptualization, diagnosis, and identification of interventions. The course by itself is not intended to qualify students to administer and interpret the described measures as part of service delivery; such qualification requires supervised clinical experience with the measures.

PSY 810: Psychotherapy with Children: Conceptual Approaches and Practical Techniques

3.00 Credits

An overview of the major theoretical approaches to child psychology, including psychoanalytic, behavioral, object relations, and humanistic models. Presents therapeutic skills and techniques. Addresses practical issues such as parental involvement, and special topics such as treatment strategies for specific childhood disorders.

PSY 811: Research Methods in Psychology

3.00 Credits

Topics include experimental and quasi-experimental research designs, observational research strategies, validity and reliability issues in research design and measurement, investigator and experimenter pitfalls in research, research report writing, and ethical standards for research with human subjects. Formerly 711.

PSY 812: Family Therapy: Theory and Practice

3.00 Credits

An overview of the major approaches to family therapy (e.g., cognitive behavioral, structural, strategic, systemic, Bowen, narrative, etc.). Focuses on clinical techniques, theoretical underpinnings, and research support for the various models. Formerly 911. Prerequisite: Psychology graduate students; others by permission of instructor.

PSY 813: Psychopathology

3.00 Credits

An investigation of the various types of disordered behavior, with emphasis on classification systems, theoretical and research approaches to the understanding of abnormal behaviors and their etiologies, and applied problems of clinical practice. Major focus is on the DSM-5 classification system. Formerly 915. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

PSY 820: Clinical Psychopharmacology

3.00 Credits

Major classes of psychotropic agents and their application in the treatment of psychopathology. Considers special treatment populations, including pediatric and geriatric. Examines therapeutic, toxic, and side effects and their management. Prerequisite: PSY 710

PSY 830: Cultural Issues in Clinical Psychology

3.00 Credits

Examines influences of culture and diversity on the understanding and practice of clinical psychology. These include acculturation and understanding of cultural differences, testing and diagnostic assessment of culturally diverse clients, and psychotherapy issues in multicultural psychology. Students should have completed at least one other course in Clinical Psychology

PSY 831: Cultural Issues in Developmental Psychology

3.00 Credits

no description available

PSY 840: Ethics and Professional Issues

3.00 Credits

Ethical and professional issues in clinical psychology: ethical standards; rights and responsibilities of clients and psychologists; privacy and confidentiality; issues in assessment, psychotherapy, and consultation; clinical psychology and the law; interprofessional relations; the social responsibility of the psychologist. Formerly 940.

PSY 852: Principles of Development

3.00 Credits

A review of classic theories of development. Analysis of major positions of psychological development. Critique of contemporary uses and abuses of the concept.

PSY 879: Human Performance Systems

3.00 Credits

Analysis of a number of different aspects of human performance (attention, memory, decision making) in modern human/machine systems. An overview of the basic principles of human factors, complemented by an examination of current research on human performance in computerized, semi-automated, and intelligent systems.

PSY 883: Applied Cognitive Psychology

3.00 Credits

Examines the interrelations between current theories in cognitive psychology and selected applications, such as problem solving, skill learning, computer use, and instructional design. Emphasizes different content areas each year.

PSY 895: Externship

1.00 Credits

For clinical psychology doctoral students who are serving a one-year required externship.

PSY 901: Clinical Assessment I: Principles of Assessment, Interviewing

3.00 Credits

Provides an initial introduction to various aspects of becoming an effective clinician, helper, and healer. Primary focus is on principles of clinical assessment using the clinical interview. Through readings, lectures, modeling, class discussion, and experiential exercises, provides training and supervision in the development of basic listening skills, structured interview techniques (e.g., mental status exams), psychiatric diagnostic assessment, and assessment report writing. Also examines relevant professional and ethical issues. Prerequisite: Clinical Students only; others by Permission of Instructor.

PSY 902: Clinical Assessment II: Intelligence Testing

3.00 Credits

Introduction to individual testing, with an emphasis on tests of intelligence (Wechsler Scales and Woodcock-Johnson). Includes demonstration, administration, scoring, and report writing, with individual supervision. Prerequisite: Clinical Doctoral Students only.

PSY 903: Laboratory in Clinical Assessment II

1.00 Credits

Lab to accompany 902. Prerequisite: Concurrent registration in 902.

PSY 906: Personality Assessment: Projective Methods

3.00 Credits

Involves the clinical assessment of personality using projective techniques. Exner scoring of the Rorschach and other projective methods, with emphasis on administration, scoring, interpretation, and report writing. For clinical doctoral students only.

PSY 907: Practicum in Individual Psychotherapy

3.00 Credits

Supervised experience in psychotherapy for second-year clinical psychology doctoral students only.

PSY 908: Practicum in Individual Psychotherapy

3.00 Credits

Supervised experience in psychotherapy for second-year clinical psychology doctoral students only.

PSY 912: Personality Assessment: Self-Report Methods

3.00 Credits

Presentation of the most frequently used self-report measures of personality and psychopathology. Special emphasis on the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory 2nd Edition (MMPI-2). Other inventories include the Personality Assessment Inventory and Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory. Also considers diagnostic uses of these instruments and communication of results to clients.

PSY 914: Practicum in Assessment

1.00 Credits

Advanced training in assessment batteries to address a variety of psychological questions. Supervision in test administration, scoring, interpretation, integration of test results and report writing. For clinical psychology doctoral students only. Prerequisites: At least third-year status, and 901, 902, 903, and either 906 or 912.

PSY 921: Psychotherapy: Research and Methods

3.00 Credits

An introduction to the practice and investigation of psychotherapy. Covers four major topics: discussion of principles of psychotherapeutic change; an overview of the major schools of psychotherapy; examination of methods, issues, and findings in research on psychotherapy; and an introduction to the practice of psychotherapy, including training in conducting a first session. For first-year doctoral students in clinical psychology only.

PSY 927: Observation of Family Therapy

1.00 Credits

Participate as an observing member of the family therapy team. Does not involve direct clinical contact. Intended to provide initial family therapy experience for clinical students who have not yet completed prerequisites for 928. Prerequisite: Clinical students only.

PSY 928: Practicum in Family Therapy I

3.00 Credits

Students participate in a family therapy team serving as therapist and as a member of the consulting team. Utilizes a one-way mirror with live supervision. Those who have not taken 812 (formerly 911) will complete a series of readings. Prerequisites: Clinical students only, second year or more advanced.

PSY 929: Practicum in Family Therapy II

1.00 Credits

Students participate in a family therapy team serving as therapist and as a member of the consulting team. Utilizes a one-way mirror with live supervision. Those who have not taken PSY 812 (formerly PSY 911) will complete a series of readings. PSY 929 is a continuation of PSY 928. Prerequisites: PSY 928.

PSY 970: Advanced Clinical Training

0 Credits

Involves training in clinical psychology that has been approved by the clinical program, and is separate from courses, practica, externship, and internship. The training can be in any area of clinical psychology, such as assessment, intervention, or research. For clinical psychology doctoral students only. Prerequisites: Requires concurrent registration in a credit course. Permission of Director of Clinical Training.

PSY 971: Advanced Clinical Training

1.00 Credits

Involves training in clinical psychology that has been approved by the clinical program, and is separate from courses, practical, externship, and internship. The training can be in any area of clinical psychology, such as assessment, intervention, or research. For clinical psychology doctoral students only. Permission of Director of Clinical Training.

PSY 972: Advanced Clinical Training

1.00 Credits

Involves training in clinical psychology that has been approved by the clinical program, and is separate from courses, practical, externship, and internship. The training can be in any area of clinical psychology, such as assessment, intervention, or research. For clinical psychology doctoral students only. Summer only. Permission of Director of Clinical Training.

PSY 995A: Clinical Internship (with classes)

0 Credits

For clinical psychology doctoral students who are serving a one-year required internship.

PSY 995B: Clinical Internship (w/o classes)

0 Credits

For clinical psychology doctoral students who are serving a one-year required internship. This course bills at the equivalent of one credit hour.

PSY 996: Doctoral Dissertation Research

0 Credits

Doctoral dissertation guidance. This course bills at the equivalent of one credit hour.

PSY 998A: Doctoral Comprehensive Examination (w/Classes)

0 Credits

no description available

PSY 998B: Doctoral Comprehensive Examination (w/o Classes)

0 Credits

Enrollment in this course bills at the equivalent of one credit hour.